Advisory Board


Prof. David Brooks, Harvard University
 
Prof. David Brooks, Harvard University

David Brooks is the Haley Family Professor of Computer Science at Harvard. Professor Brooks' research focuses on the interaction between the architecture and software of computer systems and underlying hardware implementation issues. A major focus of his research has been to explore how lower-level design issues such as power dissipation and chip cooling can be modeled and addressed when making early-stage architectural decisions in computer systems.

Professor Brooks has received several honors and awards including the 2011 ACM Maurice-Wilkes Award, NSF CAREER award, IBM Faculty Partnership Award, and DARPA Young Faculty Award. He has received best paper awards at MICRO and HPCA and has had five papers selected for IEEE Micro’s “Top Picks in Volume I Technical & Management Proposal 52 Computer Architecture” since 2005. His research interests include technology-aware computer design, with an emphasis on power-efficient computer architectures for high-performance and embedded systems.

For more information, please see his webpage at
http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/~dbrooks
Prof. David Brooks, Harvard University
 
Prof. Christos Kozyrakis, Stanford

Christos Kozyrakis is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University. He leads the multi-scale architecture & systems team (MAST), a research group that investigates hardware architectures, runtime management environments, system software, and programming models for systems ranging from cellphones to warehouse-scale datacenters. His current research focuses on resource efficient cloud computing, energy efficient compute and memory systems for emerging workloads, and scalable operating systems. Christos joined Stanford in 2002 after receiving a PhD in Computer Science from UC Berkeley. His alma mater is the  University of Crete in Greece. He is a fellow of the ACM and the IEEE, and winner of the 2015 Maurice-Wilkes Award.

For more information, please see his webpage at
http://csl.stanford.edu/~christos/
Prof. José Martínez, Cornell University  
Prof. José Martínez, Cornell University

José Martínez is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Graduate Field member of Computer Science. His research work has earned several awards; among them: two IEEE Micro Top Picks papers; a HPCA Best Paper Award, as well as HPCA and MICRO Best Paper finalists; a NSF CAREER Award; two IBM Faculty Awards; and the inaugural Computer Science Distinguished Educator Alumnus Award by the University of Illinois. On the teaching side, he has been recognized with two Kenneth A. Goldman '71 Excellence in Teaching Awards (2005 and 2014), a Ruth and Joel Spira Award for Excellence in Teaching (2015), as a Merrill Presidential Teacher (2007 and 2016), and as the 2011 Tau Beta Pi Professor of the Year in the College of Engineering.

Prof. Martínez graduated in Computer Science & Engineering in 1996 from the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, and earned MS (1999) and Ph.D. (2002) degrees in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A two-time recepient of the Spanish government's National Award for Academic Excellence, he held a four-year graduate fellowship from the Bank of Spain. While a graduate student at the UIUC, he was inducted into the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

Prof. Martínez is a member of the Computer Systems Laboratory and the Intelligent Information Systems Institute at Cornell. He is the Editor in Chief of IEEE Computer Architecture Letters, and senior member of the ACM and the IEEE. He also serves on the Advisory board of the Industry-Academia Partnership for architecture, networking, and storage needs of future data centers and cloud computing.

For more information, please see his webpage at
http://csl.cornell.edu/~martinez
Prof. Onur Mutlu, Carnegie Mellon University  
Prof. Onur Mutlu, ETH Zurich and Carnegie Mellon University

Onur Mutlu is a Professor of Computer Science at ETH Zurich, with the the Systems Group. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, where he held the Dr. William D. and Nancy W. Strecker Early Career Professorship.

His research is in computer architecture, systems, and bioinformatics. It spans and stretches the boundaries between applications, systems, languages, system software, compilers, and hardware. His research tackles many issues in high performance, energy efficiency, hardware security, fault tolerance, predictable systems, dependable systems, and hardware/software cooperation. He is especially excited about novel computation, communication and memory/storage paradigms, applied to emerging systems, technologies, and bioinformatics/medical applications. He is also excited about system design for bioinformatics and biologically inspired computing paradigms.

For more information, please see his research webpages at
Research Group at ETH: Systems Group
Research Group at CMU: SAFARI
Prof. Daniel Sanchez, MIT  
Prof. Daniel Sanchez, MIT 

Daniel Sanchez joined the EECS Department in September 2012 as an Assistant Professor and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL). He earned a PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2012, an MS in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2009, and received a BS in telecommunications engineering from the Technical University of Madrid, Spain, in 2007. Daniel is broadly interested in computer architecture and computer systems. His research strives to improve the performance, efficiency and scalability of future parallel and heterogeneous systems, and to enable programmers to leverage their full capabilities easily. His current projects focus on designing parallel architectures that provide quality-of-service guarantees; building scalable and efficient memory hierarchies for thousand-core chips; introducing, exposing, and transparently managing heterogeneity in the memory hierarchy to improve efficiency; and designing dynamic fine-grained runtimes and schedulers using both software and hardware to improve the utilization and ease of use of these highly parallel systems.

For more information, please see his webpage at
http://people.csail.mit.edu/sanchez/
Prof. Krste Asanović, Berkeley  

Prof. Krste Asanović, Berkeley

Krste Asanović is a Professor in the Computer Science Division of the EECS Department at the University of California, Berkeley. His main research areas are computer architecture, VLSI design, parallel programming and operating system design. He is Director of the ASPIRE lab tackling the challenge of improving computational efficiency now that transistor scaling is ending. ASPIRE builds upon the earlier success of the Par Lab, whose goal was to make parallel programming accessible to most programmers. He is also an Associate Director at the Berkeley Wireless Research Center, and holds a joint appointment with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Previously at MIT, he led the SCALE group, investigating advanced architectures for energy-efficient high-performance computing.  Krste is a co-founder of SiFive. https://www.sifive.com/

For more information, please see his webpage at
http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~krste/



 

Prof. Arvind Krishnamurthy, University of Washington

Arvind Krishnamurthy is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. His research interests span all aspects of building practical and robust computer systems. His recent work is aimed at making improvements to the robustness, security, and performance of Internet-scale systems. Projects include ArrakisSapphireOneSwarmuProxyReverse tracerouteBotLab, and Scatter.

For more information, please see his webpage at
http://www.cs.washington.edu/people/faculty/arvind